PARADES

parade 1

This photograph was made before the start of the annual Kingdom Day parade in Los Angeles honoring Dr. Martin Luther King. In my photographs, I try to provide enough information so the viewer can quickly see the various elements, factors and details which were carefully framed in the viewfinder. I also try to establish relationships between the details and the center of interest. The great photographer, Henri Cartier-Bresson has said the power of a photograph depends on the effective use of the details. “It’s all in the details.”

 

If you join me for my DC workshop in May part of the workshop will involve parades. As photographers we will be insiders, not the outsiders that the spectators are.

 

Parades to me have always been silly, dress up, pompous charades, with loud thumping bands and over done hats and cartoonish military style costumes, all color and sequins to make it all pretty. Huge groups marching like toy soldier dreams we might have had, all moving together as one in a machine which is supposed to charge up the people who stand aside and photograph it as they strut by in measured and very strict discipline that reduces each member of the large group to an almost nothing cog in the machine and each face and personality hidden by the outrageous costume.

 

I like to arrive before the parade while the players are arriving and getting ready, instruments just lying around. The humans come out of their hats here and are all pumped and focused on the parade. I am only focused on the humanness of them and I’m occupied with the hope I can catch some of this goodness and this real humanness that is so vital. Vital for me to stumble on and vital for me to comprehend the important significance the event before me holds for a visual message given out to the world to hopefully look at and be better for it. That is why I like the beginning and the end.

 

This for me is more thrilling to find realism about bands that are seen when the bands are not bands yet. Just humans dressing up and I am there with them to feel the intentness and the excitement they and I hold because of being part of it and maybe taking something home from it all.

 

 

 

 

 

This entry was posted in Social Documentary/Street Photography, Street Photography Tips, The Human Condition, Workshops and tagged , , .

2 Comments

  1. Arnaldo February 22, 2016 at 11:25 am #

    Mr. John Free,
    I’m beginner street photographer in Brazil and your videos are helping me to progress in street photography. I would like to participate in one of your workshop.
    My comments here are to thank you about your lessons and enthusiasm. It’s in time to write a book with all your knowledge.
    From Brazil,
    Arnaldo Santos

  2. Paul Donohoe February 16, 2016 at 2:35 pm #

    Excellent John
    “I am only focused on the humanness of them and I’m occupied with the hope I can catch some of this goodness and this real humanness that is so vital” Just about the best description I’ve read of our work

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